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Sat Mar 2, 2013, 02:37 PM

The Secret Art of Dr. Seuss

http://www.brainpickings.org/index.php/2012/03/23/the-secret-art-of-dr-seuss/


The Secret Art of Dr. Seuss
by Maria Popova

“…a creature content with himself as animal and artist, and one who didn’t give a lick or a spit for anyone’s opinion, one way or another, of his work.”

When we celebrated the 108th would-be birthday of Dr. Seuss earlier this month with his little-known book of nudes, reader Jennifer Alluisi flagged a fascinating deeper dive into Geisel’s more obscure creations — The Secret Art of Dr. Seuss, originally published in 1995, collects 65 of Geisel’s whimsical paintings, sculptures, and rough sketches of weird and wonderful beings in otherworldly settings, created for his own pleasure and never exhibited in public.

Though Geisel’s most enduring legacy remains his timeless children’s literature, this volume sheds new light on his contribution to contemporary art — a realm he approached with the same blend of idiosyncratic talent and uncompromising dedication that made him a cultural icon in his “other life.”


A Seuss drawing suggesting that no matter how big, inflated or different the image we try to portray, being ourselves is most important.

TM & © 1995 Dr. Seuss Enterprises, L. P., Secret Art Collection, courtesy of the Museum of Science and Industry

For an added treat, the introduction was penned by none other than the great Maurice Sendak, who writes:

I retain a most vivid picture of Ted standing in his studio before his easel, palette in hand, brush poised. He would lean forward and then back on his heels, head cocked to one side and then to the other. The artistic ‘dance’ step was repeated over and over again.

He enjoyed working after midnight — seldom during the working-day hours. He did not consider painting to be ‘work,’* so it had to wait till late at night. Painting was what he did for himself and not something he felt comfortable in sharing.

[…]

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Reply The Secret Art of Dr. Seuss (Original post)
G_j Mar 2013 OP
felix_numinous Mar 2013 #1
lovemydog Mar 2013 #2
G_j Mar 2013 #3
saidsimplesimon Mar 2013 #4
calimary Mar 2013 #5
lovemydog Mar 2013 #6
calimary Mar 2013 #7

Response to G_j (Original post)

Sat Mar 2, 2013, 03:04 PM

1. Very cool!

One of my favorites:

[url=http://www.flickr.com/photos/chrystalis/8522295718/][img][/img][/url]
[url=http://www.flickr.com/photos/chrystalis/8522295718/]secretartofdrseuss

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Response to felix_numinous (Reply #1)

Sat Mar 2, 2013, 03:43 PM

2. Escher meets

Dr. Seuss. Love it!

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Response to felix_numinous (Reply #1)

Sat Mar 2, 2013, 04:28 PM

3. He enjoyed working after midnight —

thanks for posting

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Response to G_j (Original post)

Sat Mar 2, 2013, 05:16 PM

4. omg, I beg forgiveness (snark).

Birthdays, the Christmas ritual, all reasons to share my favorite authors of children's literature.

Doctor Seuss, "Where the Wild Things Are" (Maurice Sendak), Shel Silverstein, are there other authors I've missed on the road to enlightenment?

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Response to saidsimplesimon (Reply #4)

Sat Mar 2, 2013, 05:41 PM

5. Kay Thompson's "Eloise." With the coolest "city child" illustrations EVER!!!

Illustrations by Hilary Knight, whose work I would just meditate upon. It simply mesmerized me, how he got expressions, movement, emotions, the fine details, the works! One of my favorite illustrators EVER and his work heavily influenced my drawing, illustrating, and cartooning later on.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hilary_Knight

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Response to calimary (Reply #5)

Sun Mar 3, 2013, 02:14 AM

6. My sister & I had all those books

and would sometimes imitate scenes from them!

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Response to lovemydog (Reply #6)

Sun Mar 3, 2013, 03:06 AM

7. "Ah the French, the French, the French!"

I had all those books, too, and read them to our kids. Our daughter has her own set now! She was a city child, too.

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