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Tue Apr 23, 2019, 10:10 AM

Forgiving Student Loans.....

Just heard someone say there is approximately $1 Trillion in student loans out there. He went on to say it would be that big a hit to the U.S. Economy if loans were forgiven and it would be a tax on the people that don't have loans.

But - when an individual's loans are forgiven - the money that used to be used to pay down those loans can now be channeled back into the economy in other ways that would benefit the economy. Former students that struggled to pay down their loans and still salvage somewhat of a life for themselves can now channel that money into maybe moving out of their parents houses and set out on their own. They can afford to get married. They could buy homes. They could furnish their homes. They can start a family. They can buy a better car to move their family.

All that money would be put back into the economy where supply and demand kicks in and churns the economy. More houses built. More appliances made. More cars sold. etc, etc, etc. All the while creating tax revenues that get pumped back into the economy.

To me it's a no brainer to forgive student loans. The U.S. Economy would be paid back in a big way that would pump up the Economy.

I'm for forgiving the student loan debt and the sooner the better.

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Arrow 57 replies Author Time Post
Reply Forgiving Student Loans..... (Original post)
global1 Apr 2019 OP
SWBTATTReg Apr 2019 #1
WhiskeyGrinder Apr 2019 #5
SWBTATTReg Apr 2019 #6
WhiskeyGrinder Apr 2019 #10
SWBTATTReg Apr 2019 #13
WhiskeyGrinder Apr 2019 #21
SWBTATTReg Apr 2019 #22
WhiskeyGrinder Apr 2019 #23
tenderfoot Apr 2019 #11
Mariana Apr 2019 #19
Rambling Man Apr 2019 #42
SWBTATTReg Apr 2019 #49
kcr Apr 2019 #17
Caliman73 Apr 2019 #44
Cal Carpenter Apr 2019 #38
gtar100 Apr 2019 #2
kerry-is-my-prez Apr 2019 #36
former9thward Apr 2019 #39
MichMan Apr 2019 #40
former9thward Apr 2019 #41
gtar100 Apr 2019 #43
MichMan Apr 2019 #48
NYMinute Apr 2019 #3
Amishman Apr 2019 #20
Freethinker65 Apr 2019 #28
Ferrets are Cool Apr 2019 #35
gtar100 Apr 2019 #45
Recursion Apr 2019 #46
NYMinute Apr 2019 #47
delisen Apr 2019 #55
BSdetect Apr 2019 #4
ooky Apr 2019 #7
BSdetect Apr 2019 #8
ooky Apr 2019 #9
kcr Apr 2019 #18
tonedevil Apr 2019 #25
Celerity Apr 2019 #12
Tech Apr 2019 #14
gratuitous Apr 2019 #15
MissB Apr 2019 #16
clementine613 Apr 2019 #24
Cold War Spook Apr 2019 #26
smirkymonkey Apr 2019 #27
neeksgeek Apr 2019 #31
smirkymonkey Apr 2019 #32
neeksgeek Apr 2019 #50
UniteFightBack Apr 2019 #29
appalachiablue Apr 2019 #30
demtenjeep Apr 2019 #33
demtenjeep Apr 2019 #34
kerry-is-my-prez Apr 2019 #37
neeksgeek Apr 2019 #51
Mosby Apr 2019 #52
samplegirl Apr 2019 #53
delisen Apr 2019 #54
Opel_Justwax Apr 2019 #56
ret5hd Apr 2019 #57

Response to global1 (Original post)

Tue Apr 23, 2019, 10:39 AM

1. I know that this would help people in going to college, but I have some serious concerns about ...

forgiving these college loans. I went to college too and paid my way through college myself by working 4 part time jobs and also, because of my excellent grades in high school a small scholarship that I had to maintain with a minimum grade point. I valued my education because I had to do the earning and learning both at the same thing.

I just feel that after I've seen so many 'Spring Break' movies and all of the partying that goes on (and the backlash against 'Spring Break' from cities all along the coast and FL (too out of control)), that why should I, as an US citizen, pay for these kids' college (in some manner, I don't know how this program would be funded or paid for), because I don't think that they'll respect and value the entire process and reasoning as to why they go to college to begin with (to further their education, to pick up marketable skills, etc.), unless they pay for it.

I can understand the needing a break, but like what we see now (Animal House atmosphere, etc.), but to offer a trillion dollar program to. If we continue to look seriously at such a program be sure to put in safeguards (minimum grades) to prevent those students / persons from abusing the program and just 'partying' all of the time. Also, if people are kicked off the program due to bad grades and / or just plain negligence, they must pay (loans not forgiven), this gives them incentives to continue with good grades and finish the program.

Even with the safeguards above, I still hesitate to support such a program. I guess it is because I never have been given anything, had to work for it, and I think that this 'free college' program is going to have problems with it (for we all know how effective the government works, eh?).

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Response to SWBTATTReg (Reply #1)

Tue Apr 23, 2019, 10:57 AM

5. I struggle with understanding the logic of "I had to work my ass off, other people should too" for

something that benefits both individuals directly and society as a whole. Can you walk me through it?

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Response to WhiskeyGrinder (Reply #5)

Tue Apr 23, 2019, 10:59 AM

6. Sure, why don't you work your ass off like I did, both to survive and also pay for school. I am ...

simply saying that make sure those that get a free ride appreciate it and value it and get appropriate grades. Period. Don't put words in my mouth.

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Response to SWBTATTReg (Reply #6)

Tue Apr 23, 2019, 11:10 AM

10. I apologize for distilling your post into something you didn't feel was representative of your

position.

So how do you make sure someone "appreciates it" appropriately? What does that look like?

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Response to WhiskeyGrinder (Reply #10)

Tue Apr 23, 2019, 11:27 AM

13. Good grades, attendence, common sense stuff to ensure that value given is value rec'd ...

Better yet, what are your conditions for those to receive the benefits of this program if offered and/or created?

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Response to SWBTATTReg (Reply #13)

Tue Apr 23, 2019, 12:58 PM

21. None, other than income-based formulas for forgiveness.

Warren called for a blanket $50k forgiveness if household income is less than $100k, for example, which seems like a good place to start the conversation. I'm also a fan of free tuition for public college and universities.

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Response to WhiskeyGrinder (Reply #21)

Tue Apr 23, 2019, 02:25 PM

22. Yes, this would be good. There are a lot of good kids that simply can't afford the cost to...

go. Perhaps if the republicans rescinded the 2017 tax cuts and jobs bill (which gave 83% of the cuts to the already well to do (and didn't need it), and which cost $4,000,000,000,000 (and we the lower % of Americans are paying for), then this program would these kids. I still want (and most if not all scholarships demand this) good attendance and grades), I think it's only best to keep a vested interest on the part of kids to know that they need to get good grades and attend.

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Response to SWBTATTReg (Reply #22)

Tue Apr 23, 2019, 02:32 PM

23. I'm not hung up on "good" grades or "good attendance." Colleges have minimum acceptance and

performance standards. If public colleges and universities provide free tuition to those who are accepted, and a student achieves that minimum performance standard, that's good enough for me. People generally know whether college is their jam or not, and they generally make it clear whether it is or not. The "vested interest" the state has is making sure barriers are removed for people who want to go.

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Response to SWBTATTReg (Reply #6)

Tue Apr 23, 2019, 11:11 AM

11. "those that get a free ride appreciate it"...

Like students that get free rides via academic scholarships. I'm sure they just party the night away for four years. Play a lot of cards... etc...



I find it interesting that no one ever talks about the obscene tuition rates these days. 100k for a year at an Ivy League/Private school. 15k+ for an "affordable" state university.

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Response to tenderfoot (Reply #11)

Tue Apr 23, 2019, 12:49 PM

19. But those damn kids should work their way like I did!



It's especially hilarious how the poster complains about the "Animal House atmosphere" "like what we see now" as if it's something new. The movie Animal House was released in 1978, and the story was set in 1962.

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Response to SWBTATTReg (Reply #6)

Wed Apr 24, 2019, 06:54 PM

42. What makes you think other people don't "work their ass off" just because you did?

Plus, consider that many people "work their asses off" and still end up in a bind.

It's not a character flaw or a function of how "hard" someone works.

Sometimes, despite best efforts, shit doesn't work out for lots of people.

Do we punish them?

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Response to Rambling Man (Reply #42)

Thu Apr 25, 2019, 02:26 PM

49. I never that others don't work their ass off too. Never did. Don't put words into my post.

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Response to SWBTATTReg (Reply #1)

Tue Apr 23, 2019, 12:20 PM

17. Did your college teach you that movies are just like real life?

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Response to kcr (Reply #17)

Wed Apr 24, 2019, 07:47 PM

44. Good one!

Must have taken a comparative film class on the theme "Spring Break".

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Response to SWBTATTReg (Reply #1)

Wed Apr 24, 2019, 06:01 PM

38. The vast majority of kids are not living an experience like you describe

They are working hard to get their degrees and being given what are essentially predatory loans to do so. This isn't like it was for previous generations. The cost of higher education has skyrocketed and scholarships and grants aren't what they used to be. Whether or not higher ed should be free is another question, but we are approaching a major financial disaster if these loans are all defaulted on, and given the shitty wages most of these kids are graduating into, it is not looking good.

I would suggest ignoring the salacious headlines about kids with affluenza, or whatever image you have in mind, and read an actual nonfiction book called Kids These Days by Malcolm Harris if you want to know what most of these young people are really dealing with, both culturally and economically. As an aging Gen-Xer, it was eye-opening for me.

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Response to global1 (Original post)

Tue Apr 23, 2019, 10:39 AM

2. Me too. Student loans are obscene these days and only serve

to concentrate wealth into fewer hands. They are stifling a whole generation from moving forward. It's amounts to a select group of old people sucking the life out our children, playing on their hopes and dreams giving them the shackles of big debt instead. Those who profit from it have some serious karma coming their way.

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Response to gtar100 (Reply #2)

Wed Apr 24, 2019, 05:50 PM

36. Yep

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Response to gtar100 (Reply #2)

Wed Apr 24, 2019, 06:06 PM

39. Who profits from it?

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Response to former9thward (Reply #39)

Wed Apr 24, 2019, 06:31 PM

40. Colleges and the Federal government

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Response to MichMan (Reply #40)

Wed Apr 24, 2019, 06:47 PM

41. Maybe we should put a max on student loans.

Maybe that would act as a brake on constant rising tuition rates.

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Response to former9thward (Reply #39)

Wed Apr 24, 2019, 07:42 PM

43. Start here... Wall Street

How Wall Street Profits From Student Debt. $1.2 trillion i debt... how many salivate at such a number as they shirk off morals and ethics to get a piece of that action.

Why are student loans unforgivable in bankruptcies? Simple... investors and security.

And others have mentioned the schools themselves. Let's not forget the bankers and the whole industry around student loans.

Did you think that today's cost of an education was somehow natural? We are a people who have refined the art of exploitation and ritual sacrifice of our young. Less bloody messy when we can chain them to years of debt, if not an entire lifetime, so that others can play mind games around money and not actually have to work for a living.

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Response to gtar100 (Reply #43)

Wed Apr 24, 2019, 10:10 PM

48. The Feds are the lender for Student Loans for the last 10 years

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Response to global1 (Original post)

Tue Apr 23, 2019, 10:47 AM

3. I don't think the loans themselves should be forgiven

Maybe the original principal be recast at the Fed discount rate and the excess interest forgiven.

Forgiving the loans is a slap in the face of millions who struggled, lived frugally and worked several jobs to pay off those debts.

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Response to NYMinute (Reply #3)

Tue Apr 23, 2019, 12:51 PM

20. This is probably the best option; interest free with easy deferment

I worked two jobs during college and made a lot of sacrifices to pay mine off in a few years ($25k total)

Interest free with very easy hardship deferrals seems like it would eliminate the burden without the adverse incentives and fairness concerns. Also would be much easier to finance. Rework education funding going forward to cut or eliminate tuition for future generations

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Response to NYMinute (Reply #3)

Tue Apr 23, 2019, 09:50 PM

28. This seems more reasonable to me.

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Response to NYMinute (Reply #3)

Tue Apr 23, 2019, 10:35 PM

35. This is my stance also.

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Response to NYMinute (Reply #3)

Wed Apr 24, 2019, 07:55 PM

45. I don't consider it a slap in the face. I've paid my student loans off and

have no resentment towards those who would benefit directly. I consider it a course correction. What I resent is the whole system and the greedy people who set it up. They have not made the world a better place through these money schemes they dreamed up. They are nothing but trolls blocking the bridge until you pay them. Useless, worthless, selfish, greedy trolls. The sooner we get rid of this system of debt, the better.

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Response to NYMinute (Reply #3)

Wed Apr 24, 2019, 07:57 PM

46. Is not slapping someone in the face a slap in the face

to people who have been slapped in the face?

I've seriously never understood that logic. I've paid off my loans. Zero harm is done to me if someone else's loans are forgiven; if anything I benefit because that person can now buy more of the stuff I make.

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Response to Recursion (Reply #46)

Wed Apr 24, 2019, 08:02 PM

47. You have a point there. nt

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Response to NYMinute (Reply #3)

Fri Apr 26, 2019, 12:34 PM

55. Can they be given tax credits?

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Response to global1 (Original post)

Tue Apr 23, 2019, 10:53 AM

4. Can I get a refund for all the cash we spent putting our child through university without a loan?

That would be nice.

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Response to BSdetect (Reply #4)

Tue Apr 23, 2019, 11:02 AM

7. I'd like a refund for the loan I paid back.

We could both put the money back into the economy.

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Response to ooky (Reply #7)

Tue Apr 23, 2019, 11:03 AM

8. And let's add the lost opportunity costs too, thanks.

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Response to BSdetect (Reply #8)

Tue Apr 23, 2019, 11:05 AM

9. Good thinking.

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Response to BSdetect (Reply #4)

Tue Apr 23, 2019, 12:27 PM

18. Want a refund on all your groceries too because of WIC?

Or your rent/mortgage because of HUD? Time for the Wahmbulance.

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Response to kcr (Reply #18)

Tue Apr 23, 2019, 09:17 PM

25. Well put. /nt

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Response to global1 (Original post)

Tue Apr 23, 2019, 11:15 AM

12. Total Student Loan Debt: $1.56 trillion

FAR more than total credit card debt



https://www.forbes.com/sites/zackfriedman/2019/02/25/student-loan-debt-statistics-2019/#21ee661d133f


Student loan debt in 2019 is the highest ever.

The latest student loan debt statistics for 2019 show how serious the student loan debt crisis has become for borrowers across all demographics and age groups. There are more than 44 million borrowers who collectively owe $1.5 trillion in student loan debt in the U.S. alone. Student loan debt is now the second highest consumer debt category - behind only mortgage debt - and higher than both credit cards and auto loans. Borrowers in the Class of 2017, on average, owe $28,650, according to the Institute for College Access and Success.


snip

Public Service Loan Forgiveness Statistics

As of September 30, 2018, here are the latest public service student loan debt statistics:

Public Service Loan Forgiveness cumulative borrowers: 890,516

Borrowers who submitted applications: 41,221

Total number of applications: 49,669

Number of applications approved: 423


Number of applications denied: 32,409

Number of applications denied due to missing information: 11,892

Borrowers who have received student loan forgiveness: 206

Total dollar amount forgiven: $12.3 million


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Response to global1 (Original post)

Tue Apr 23, 2019, 11:39 AM

14. if we provide free college for everyone, maybe.

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Response to global1 (Original post)

Tue Apr 23, 2019, 11:47 AM

15. There are lots of benefits and freebies not available or applicable to me

I don't begrudge other people getting them, certainly not like I begrudge an insanely profitable corporation not paying taxes because of the vagaries of the tax code (or, more likely, specific loopholes written into the code for the sole benefit of insanely profitable corporations). I don't get a deduction for children, I don't get a deduction for medical expenses. I've always tried to live within my means, and my frugal habits have set me up well for retirement in a few years. But in addition to my own carefulness, I was also lucky. Lucky I didn't have some health emergency. Lucky I didn't get plowed into by a drunk driver. Lucky I didn't have my home destroyed by a natural disaster. Lucky in countless other ways because as a white guy, I didn't have to tangle with sexism or racism keeping me down.

The current student loan situation is a decades-long effort to saddle people with unsupportable debt for the enrichment of a select few. One anecdote in the mid-1970s was sufficient for some beady-eyed congressman to start the process of making the student loan system as punitive as possible. Anytime we try to stop oppression, there are going to be people who survived that oppression who won't derive any benefit. That's a poor reason to keep an oppressive system in place.

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Response to global1 (Original post)

Tue Apr 23, 2019, 12:09 PM

16. I'm all for forgiving student loans.

I graduated with a bunch of student loans- probably the federal maximum.

When I first started, tuition and fees were $1500/year. When I graduated, they were $1500 per term - granted, I put about 5 years between my freshman and sophomore years of college, but... still.

Now they are $4500 per term. That doesnít include living expenses. And my university is a state school, so things are relatively reasonable.

It sucked paying those loans off over many years (interest rate was ridiculously low). I was able to still have a life- house, kids, vacations - thanks to dh who graduated without loans.

My kids will get through without loans because of scholarships. We are shielded from the true cost because of that. Many of their classmates are going into serious debt.

That debt will hinder them buying houses or cars or starting families. All of those constraints have an effect on our economy.

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Response to global1 (Original post)

Tue Apr 23, 2019, 09:13 PM

24. Forgiving Federal Student Loans Is Doable...

... but how do you propose "forgiving" private student loans without violating the Takings clause?

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Response to global1 (Original post)

Tue Apr 23, 2019, 09:30 PM

26. Low interest student loans.

 

Free college isn't free, taxpayers pay for it. Now, my wife and I have a very good taxfree income so it would have very little if any effect on us.

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Response to global1 (Original post)

Tue Apr 23, 2019, 09:46 PM

27. I only borrowed between $45-$50k in grad school loans.

Through a series of hardships, I had to defer and then go into forbearance (after a long period of unemployment after 9/11 in NYC) because they would not agree to negotiate . Once I was employed again, I could not make the minimum payment so I offered to pay them what I could and they refused. I had to pay what they asked or go back into forbearance. Eventually, the loans ballooned to the point where they were so overwhelming I could not get out from under them. I have never been in default. I have an income sensitive payment now and I pay it monthly, but I owe more than $85,000 more than I borrowed. That is bullshit! It is killing me.

I am willing to pay back what I borrowed, but I am not willing to pay them for a ridiculous amount of interest when I had no chance to pay them back in a situation where I was desperate. If I had invested that much money at the rate of interest that they were charging me, do you think I would be worth that much now? Fuck no! These people are taking advantage of desperate people and as far as I am concerned they can all go to hell.

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Response to smirkymonkey (Reply #27)

Tue Apr 23, 2019, 10:01 PM

31. This. A thousand times.

I too borrowed about that amount to get a masterís. Started grad school in 2007. Had the stupidity of graduating in 2009, on the heels of the great recession.

News flash: nobody goes to college planning to go bankrupt. (Never mind asking for bankruptcy protection, that basically doesnít apply to student loans.) Iím using the word bankruptcy here in the original meaning of ďunable to pay the bill.Ē

For three years I scrambled for literally any work, used up all my deferments and forbearances... I have done retail, food service, costumed characters... anything. Eventually got a gig as an adjunct instructor and as things stabilized and I picked up more classes I finally started making payments a couple years ago. But my annual income is about $25,000. So with interest piling up the whole time my balance is enormous, and even though Iím paying, since my payment plan is income sensitive the net payments barely touch the principle.

I am now liable for a loan amount that is more than double what I borrowed.

Editing weeks later, I know; sorry to post to an old thread. But, just came in to add, today I made another payment and decided to take a peak at my payment history. Turns out, my last six months' worth of payments, exactly $0.00 has gone towards principal.

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Response to neeksgeek (Reply #31)

Tue Apr 23, 2019, 10:08 PM

32. You get it. But so many people don't. They don't understand how so many well

intentioned people go into higher education fully expecting to be able to pay off the loans when they graduate, but for one reason or another, fall upon hard times and get behind. Once you get behind, it is almost impossible to catch up unless you have wealthy parents. Some people here make me sick with their callousness.

Like you, I am still making good on my loans, but I am buried and will never be able to retire. Is this really what Democrats want to see? I am hoping to die early because I do not want to spend the rest of my life chained to this fucking unfair interest. It's not worth it.

Why should we suffer so they can get rich?

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Response to smirkymonkey (Reply #32)

Fri Apr 26, 2019, 12:00 PM

50. I believe this is what Republicans want to see.

Last edited Fri Apr 26, 2019, 12:44 PM - Edit history (1)

They want the well-educated people of modest backgrounds stuck in situations that guarantee permanent underclass status.

Editing to add: not to mention the fact that being on a paycheck-to-paycheck basis for a whole decade changes a person.

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Response to global1 (Original post)

Tue Apr 23, 2019, 09:54 PM

29. I'm not with this - I know MANY students who poo pooed the idea of community college for 2 years

to save money and they took out those loans. Now I'm thinking we can forgive interest or we can do something to help with the 'burden'...but I'm not into a free pass and you should pay something for college...SOMETHING.

You value things you pay for...make it a kind of minor co pay based on income, but everybody should pay into it for goodness sake.

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Response to global1 (Original post)

Tue Apr 23, 2019, 09:58 PM

30. The US is severely weakened by indebted young people who are

harmed at a young age, prevented from marrying, starting families, owning homes and beginning companies.

Two plus generations ago, young Americans weren't saddled with public college loan debt. It began with Reagan in the 1980s and excess financialization of the economy- the tuition cost ratio went from 80% carried by schools/state tax revenue and 20% by families, to the opposite- 80% cost to families and 20% paid by state taxes.

Countries benefit greatly from an educated and healthy young generation and workforce. Figure out how to pay down loans and lower costs to free up young Americans so they can contribute to society and have a chance to get ahead.
------------------
>'We Are Crushing the Next Generation': Young Millennials Saddled With $1,005,000,000,000 in Student Debt," Common Dreams, Feb. 25, 2019. https://www.commondreams.org/news/2019/02/25/we-are-crushing-next-generation-young-millennials-saddled-1005000000000-student-debt

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Response to global1 (Original post)

Tue Apr 23, 2019, 10:13 PM

33. As someone who still has SL this would be a great boost to our discretionary spending

We have been paying on them for 20 years but it seems like the balance never goes down.


Tomorrow, I have to call a number -I got three messages saying my SL was included in the navient/Sallie Mae mess and I could get reduced or even forgiven.

That would allow me to spend more on things we would like to have.

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Response to demtenjeep (Reply #33)

Tue Apr 23, 2019, 10:16 PM

34. not to mention-our district has frozen teacher pay for 8 years

really makes it tight when every thing goes up but your paycheck

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Response to global1 (Original post)

Wed Apr 24, 2019, 06:00 PM

37. Eventually this will blow up in all of our faces. The economy cannot handle large #'s of people

Who will have crappy credit and will not be able to buy homes, cars, etc. As a former Realtor, I see Millennials, Gen X'ers and younger not being able to buy homes, rent apts. it is NOT sustainable. How are they going to marry and have children? The economy is headed for the crapper.

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Response to kerry-is-my-prez (Reply #37)

Fri Apr 26, 2019, 12:04 PM

51. Exactly. nt

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Response to global1 (Original post)

Fri Apr 26, 2019, 12:07 PM

52. people should be asking for an accounting

Of why it can cost 30K per year to go to a state university. Where the hell is all that money going?

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Response to global1 (Original post)

Fri Apr 26, 2019, 12:18 PM

53. My husband lost his job after 31 years we are now

riddled with his student loan to get a job with less wages than his former factory job. We are in our 60ís.

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Response to global1 (Original post)

Fri Apr 26, 2019, 12:32 PM

54. Those who have squeezed themselves to pay their loans can be given

tax credits if fairness is presented as an obstacle.

the student loan business was capitalism on steroids. Loans should have been focused on older students able to make concrete investment decisions.

Instead they were marketed to hundreds of thousands of 17 year olds who in many cases were not prepared for what they were signing up for.

Reminds me of how unscrupulous army recruiters used to sign up Army recruits years ago.

The beneficiaries have been college administrators, college presidents making multi-million dollar salaries (whole new class of 1 percenters), bankers, members of congress getting campaign donations, college financial officers getting benefits for steering students to private loans, and the horror stories of students victimized by proprietary colleges.

When we eat the young we have no future.


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Response to global1 (Original post)

Fri Apr 26, 2019, 12:42 PM

56. I'm for a flat tax for people that get student grants and loans.

Last edited Fri Apr 26, 2019, 07:29 PM - Edit history (1)

If a person accepts a pell grant and/or student loans then they would pay a 3% flat tax on all income until the age of retirement.
No one has to worry about paying thousands every month any more in loan repayments and the government will get their money back. The average workers makes $44880 per year so they would have $1346 deducted every year. Present student loan recipients could change to this system if they choose. We have to pay for government benefits. This is no different then the FICA tax which is a pay as you go system. Only those that benefit from the entitlements will have to pay for it.

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Response to Opel_Justwax (Reply #56)

Fri Apr 26, 2019, 02:23 PM

57. You don't benefit from living in an educated society?

Hmmm. I do. Just where do you live?

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